Hand Signal Guide For Crane Operators and Crew

This hand signal guide is for crane operators to work safely

Crane operators must be very skilled and need to be trained properly so that they can perform their jobs efficiently and safely. While working on any site, the operators also require some assistance from the crew or workers present on the site.

The work sites are usually bustling with life, energy and activity during a project and are often so noisy that you cannot communicate easily. People use radio sets or walkie talkies to reach out to each other in such places.

Crane operators are professionals who are entrusted with the loading, movement and carrying of various heavy objects as a part of their daily activities. It is very important to guide the operators during the crane operation to ensure there are no accidents.

We ensure to keep providing you good tips for crane operation and so we have taken a wonderful and important article from TNT Crane & Rigging so that you can get benefited by this valuable information.

The crew or workers must use their hand signals to guide the operators to ensure safety during the process. This article is comprised of definitions and explanations of different hand signals that can be used in order to help the crane operators.

Read the complete article to learn more about this important topic!

Here are the different hand signals used for crane operation, along with their explanations:

Use Main Hoist

There are going to be occasions when the main hoist is necessary for its greater strength. In these instances, the signaler cocks their right arm outward and bends their elbow outward, which allows the signaler to tap on their hard hat with their closed hand as if they were knocking on a door.

Use Whip Line

On some occasions, the whip line or fast line may be preferable to the main hoist. To signal using the whip line, the signaler places his/her left arm horizontally across the front of the body, palm upward. The signaler then makes a forward-facing fist with the right hand, and puts the right elbow into his/her left palm in front of themselves.

Raise Boom

To raise the boom, the signaler begins with the right arm outstretched to the side. From there, the signaler points the thumb upward.

Lower Boom

To lower the boom is the reversal of the signal to raise the boom. The signaler begins with the right arm outstretched to the side. From there, they point their thumb downwards.

Swing

It can be necessary to turn or swing the crane. In these instances, the signaler extends the right arm straight outward to the side, with the palm facing downward.

Extend Boom

The boom or primary arm of the crane, must sometimes be extended for its reach. In some cases the boom can be extended independently of lowering or raising it. When the boom must be extended, the signaler places his/her closed hands on either side of their body at hip height, with both thumbs facing outward.

Retract Boom

Retracting the boom can often exert greater leverage with better stability than when the boom is extended. When the boom must be retracted, the signaler places their closed hands at around waist height, with thumbs pointing inward toward their body.

Read the complete article explaining different hand signals for guiding crane operators to learn more about this important aspect of safe crane operation.

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