Overhead Crane Inspection Guide

Hand signal guide for crane operators

Being prepared is the best way to avoid an accident, and this is especially true when it comes to overhead cranes. OSHA has found that an average of 71 crane-related fatalities happen each year. In most of these cases, an inspection could have identified the fatal problem before tragedy struck. That’s also not counting the thousands of less-serious accidents involving cranes that could have been prevented if the equipment had been subjected to the required inspection. Although these accidents may not result in the loss of life, they can result in injuries as well as serious fines for safety violations and costly downtime.

Regularly inspecting overhead crane equipment is one of the most important steps companies can take to cut down on these unfortunate crane-related incidents. However, it is crucial that operators and supervisors do more than give their equipment a quick glance to see if everything simply looks all right. Overhead crane equipment must be put through a rigorous and thorough inspection process before it can be cleared for safe crane operation. What’s more, there are dozens of inspection points that must be checked during these inspections. Additionally, certain inspection points must be checked on a more frequent basis than others, so it is essential that operators and supervisors understand OSHA’s requirements for these inspections. The following crane guide illustrates many of the most important inspection points on overhead crane equipment. By following it, companies can help ensure that their equipment and their job sites will be much safer and better prepared.

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Overhead Crane & Inspection Guidelines courtesy of Crane 1

Tips To Handle Construction Risk

Some tips to handle construction risk

Some handy tips to help you handle construction risk

Construction has always been a very prolific field. It has continued to be an ever-green field with numerous jobs for people with different backgrounds.  In addition to being a great field, construction also has certain risks that other fields do not have. In fact, it may not be wrong to say that construction is one of the riskiest fields out there.

Crane Tips is all about cranes and construction. We deeply care about our valuable readers and that is the reason we share great information with all of you on a regular basis.

As stated above, construction is indeed a difficult and risky field but the risks in construction can be handled and lowered by employing some tips and following certain strategies.

The strategies to manage the risks in construction are presented here, so that you can handle the project in a safe and wise manner.

Do not miss out the golden tips to manage construction risk by reading the complete article!

Allocate Risk

The contract negotiation and preparation phase is the best time for all project leaders, including the owner, contractors, architects, and building manager, to come together and anticipate all potential risks and assign responsibility of those risks to parties most apt to handle them should the unwanted arise. For example, the building owner and architect should be charged with ensuring design and environment issues are worked out and should draft a plan in case something arises. Meanwhile, contractors should be charged with ensuring personnel are equipped with all the necessary safety guidelines and understand how best to maneuver the environment with equipment in a safe and secure manner.

Managing Funding Risks and Feasibility Risks

These two types of risks are commonly described as “invisible risks” as they are rarely apparent until they are, in which they change the entire game. Yet, with careful preparation and research, most undertaking construction tasks can avoid them.

The first, feasibility risks, arise most commonly out of environmental issues that were not fully addressed in the original plan proposal. They include things like:

  • Extreme weather-based delays
  • Unforeseen factors of a specific location
  • New issues with coding and zoning laws

The ‘Management’ in Risk Management

Finally, it is important to note that this article is entitled with “managing construction risks” because the critical lesson here is not how to avoid all unwanted occupancies, but how to cope with the inevitable. Here, you research, prepare, and assign. Understand all of the potential issues with a construction project, consult with the available experts and professionals, set aside budgets to deal with funding risks, and ensure you have the right insurance in place before signing contracts.

Learn more about this important topic by reading the complete guide on managing construction risk.