10 Tips for Better Mobile Crane Operations

10 Tips for Better Mobile Crane Operations

 

1. Never override the mobile crane’s computer.

2. Be aware of all overhead hazards – specifically close-by buildings and any power lines that are within the zone of operation.

3. Read the load charts – prior to turning the key in any new mobile crane.

4. Cell phones in the cab – while the crane’s key is on the cell phone is off.

5. Always note the changing conditions on the jobsite – from personnel to weather to surroundings. If you work at night, ensure the proper lighting is in place to ensure 100% safety.

6. Sometimes in a working situation, the crane operator needs to stop, evaluate, and find a safer lift plan.

7. Check ground conditions – before crane setup, ensure that the site is suitable to support your mobile crane and the future suspended loads.

8. Use appropriate pads & cribbing – mobile crane operators need to make sure they are using correct pads or cribbing to avoid having an outrigger fail or sink when they are making a lift.

9. Before starting your crane, always double check the oil, gas, and other fluid levels.

10. At the beginning of your shift, walk-around your crane checking for mechanical, electrical, structural, and hydraulic issues (MESH).

Mobile crane operators are a small brotherhood whose main goal is to ensure the safety of those we are working with. If we can avoid a few simple operating errors, it will go a long way in avoiding an incident on the job site.

 

Be crane safe everyone, we want you home at hight.describe the image

Cranes are Construction Machines Not Toys

The recent ‘climb’ in the number of people trying to scale tower cranes in metropolis’s around North America is getting ridiculous. As reported by the Barrie CTV news, the numbers are ever increasing.

The number of people climbing multi-storey cranes in York Region is a growing concern for emergency crews.

On Sunday night, two 16-year-olds were spotted at the top of a 13-storey construction crane in Newmarket. The teens climbed down and were arrested for mischief and trespassing.
“It seems almost crazy that we have to be here to warn people about the dangers of climbing cranes, construction cranes, but nevertheless here we are,” Const. Andy Pattenden told CP24.

“People, primarily youths, have been climbing these multi-storey construction cranes,” Pattenden said. “It’s happening at night. They’re going out there, the reason for which we’re still not sure why they’re doing it – probably for thrill-seeking, something from YouTube. They’re gonna climb up and take a selfie at the top of these cranes.”

Between May 22 and June 11, police have dealt with four cases of people climbing cranes. These have happened in Richmond Hill, Whitchurch-Stouffville and Newmarket.

Parents are being asked to speak with their children about the dangers.

We couldn’t agree more.

Link-Belt Tests and Introduces TCC-2500 Tele-Boom Crawler Crane – Crane Tips

Link-Belt Tests and Introduces TCC-2500 Tele-Boom Crawler Crane

The new Link-Belt TCC-2500 was already hard at work the same week Link-Belt Cranes formally introduced the 250-ton telescopic-boom crawler crane at ConExpo-Con/Agg in Las Vegas, Nev.

L.R. Wilson and Sons, Inc. of Gambrills, Md., is field testing the TCC-2500, completing tilt-up panel work and steel erection for a 38,000-sq.-ft. warehouse in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Capitol Heights, Md.

A 13,000-lb. spreader bar and six-part load line were used to place panels weighing as much as 84,000 lbs.

“The crane is very smooth. It picked up the largest panels at a 35.4-ft. radius, with a 68° boom angle, and we were good up to 123,000 lbs.,” said operator Jamie Foster of L.R. Wilson and Sons, Inc.

In total, the company set 38 precast tilt-up panels over seven days before moving on to steel erection for the building’s interior.

Wilson normally uses a lattice-boom crane to erect panels of this size, but the company welcomed the chance to prove the new Link-Belt TCC-2500’s machine’s capability.

“This machine is a beast, and I cannot think of a better way to test our design and the functionality of this crane than with pour-in-place tilt wall work. Based on early comments I think we have hit a home run,” said Scott Knight, Link-Belt product manager for lattice and telescopic crawler cranes.

NFT delivers 10 Potain tower cranes to Royal Atlantis Residences site in Dubai

Tower cranes, they are just cool. They do amazing work and provide quick easy erection of buildings like no other construction equipment on the market. The first units of Potain MR 418 cranes in the UAE have been erected at the Royal Atlantis Residences construction site in Dubai.

NFT, the exclusive dealer of Potain in the region, supplied 10 brand new units of the crane for the Palm Jumeirah project, located next to the Atlantis resort.

The MR 418s have been fully erected by NFT on fixing angles at heights ranging from 104m to 190m free-standing.

During Phase 2 of the operation, the cranes will be braced with special anchorage bracing, spanning 16m in length, to the core of the building.

NFT has also delivered two Potain GTMR 400 units to the construction site.

Value-added services provided by NFT as part of the contract include spare parts delivery and technical consulting.

“An entire container filled with MR 418 spare parts” has also been delivered to the site.

In a press statement, NFT said the move ensures client needs are “anticipated and immediately satisfied on site, without worrying about availability and delivery time”.

A two-shift schedule will be implemented to ensure 24-hour operations of the cranes, with full-time technicians to be based on site to ensure non-stop service delivery.

Ssangyong Engineering & Construction and Besix, in a joint venture, were awarded the project’s construction contract in February 2016.

According to the press statement, NFT’s previous work experience with Besix helped it secure the contract to deliver Potain units for the mega project “after months of negotiations”.

Remarking on the project, Bassem Kini, the NFT operations director tasked with the Royal Atlantis Residences project, said “erection went smoothly, and the tower cranes are working beautifully”.

He added: “The project is positively challenging, and we have enjoyed working with the client’s site team, which is professional and cooperative with NFT.”

Royal Atlantis Resort and Residences will boast almost 800 guest rooms, more than 230 serviced apartments, and 46 storeys.

Tower Cranes in Denver CO

We found this great article posted by NEW9 in Denver Colorado. Pretty awesome to see the life of a tower crane operator from the perspective of an outsider.

Check out the full article below and go check out their full video.

DENVER – It’s the dance of the cranes.

You see them everywhere in Denver – tower cranes building new buildings and fueling Colorado’s economy.

But have you ever wondered who operates those cranes, and how they get up there?

Photojournalist Eric Kehe and I got the chance to find out.

RMS Cranes, a member of the TNT Crane family, and Saunders Construction invited us to go up a crane. They said just climb up the ladder one floor – then do it 30 more times.

Is this a good time to mention I’m not crazy about heights?

We climbed up the crane across from Union Station where they’re building a new office tower.

There’s a little landing on each floor where you can stop to catch your breath, and enjoy the view.

It’s a bit exhausting but we made it to the top, where we met crane operator Jeff Macklin.

Macklin says his days are just ups and downs.

Workers on the ground call him on a radio when they need him to pick up equipment or materials, and deliver it to another location.

The cranes of Denver.    

Sometimes he gets calls from different crews in different locations, all at one time.

It’s how he spends his 8 to 14 hour days in the air.

And once he gets up there, he doesn’t climb down until his shift is finished.

If there’s bad weather, he just rides it out.

Rain, hail, snow, wind, lightening – Macklin has seen it all from his perch high in the sky.

He says you need to be highly trained, certified and a little crazy to operate a tower crane.

But on the upside, he says you just can’t beat the view.

“Colorado’s national or state bird is the crane,” Macklin said. “I remember there was a time you’d never see a tower crane up. Now you get 20 or 30 of them. “

Sunrise, sunset, aircraft flying by, even police officers chasing suspects down below – he has the perfect spot to see it all.