The River Delta Soil

Understanding Ground Conditions

At Crane Tips we realize the importance of the ground condition in which cranes perform their work. Since the Fraser Valley is a River Delta, it’s imperative that the crane operators use the correct crane pads to prevent any and all accidents that could arrive from the failed footing.

Here’s a great article we found on soil and the importance of soil in growing things within the lower mainland of BC.

The River Delta Soil

There’s a perception in the lower mainland of British Columbia that because we live in a river delta, all of our soil is ideal for growing. This puts to question the need to purchase manufactured soil.  

We decided to “Ask Tom” his opinion on the matter.

Interviewer:

Tom, we live in a river delta so why do people need to purchase engineered soil? Shouldn’t our native soil be ideal for growing?

Tom:

Yes, we do live in a river delta and much of our soil is good for growing. However, in the land development process, the top layer of organic soil is usually removed.  Some of this soil is actually really good. The problem is you can’t guarantee it’s composition. To ensure that your soil is the right composition for growing, it is best to purchase engineered soil.  

Soil structure an important aspect of a grow medium.  There is a difference between good soil and the right soil structure for a grow medium.

Interviewer:

What is right soil structure?

Tom:

Good Question.  Let me tell you about our engineered soil and why, in my professional opinion, it provides the best soil structure for your grow medium.  

First, We ensure that our engineered soil has the right amount of Sand, Silt and Clay.  We also test that the ideal amount of water and air are able to move throughout the soil.  

The sand used in our soil composition is a medium-fraction river sand. Since we have such a large river running through the southern portion of our province we have amazing access to high quality of sand. The Canadian Government of Fisheries does an amazing job of conserving the river while still allowing proper access to the sand.

So there are three main components, sand, silt and clay, to an engineered soil.  At Denbow, we regularly test our soil to make sure it is in the right amount of these parts.  Our soils adhere to strict laboratory-tested guidelines and meet BC Landscape Standards. When you just mix the excavated dirt on sight, you are unable to achieve this same standard.

When you have the right structure then the right amount of air and water are able to move naturally through the soil. Air is just as important as water as it allows the right drainage for plant growth. Residents of British Columbia know we get a significant amount of rainfall. This amount of water requires our soil structure in BC to have a specific amount of sand to allow the water to drain.

To conclude, there you have it. Although the mighty Fraser Runs runs through B.C.’s entire lower mainland, we still need engineered soil so we can be successful with our landscaping.

In our next post we’ll be discussing the importance of pH balance in addition to soil structure.  

Stay tuned for more Ask Tom Articles.

Overhead Crane Inspection Guide

Hand signal guide for crane operators

Being prepared is the best way to avoid an accident, and this is especially true when it comes to overhead cranes. OSHA has found that an average of 71 crane-related fatalities happen each year. In most of these cases, an inspection could have identified the fatal problem before tragedy struck. That’s also not counting the thousands of less-serious accidents involving cranes that could have been prevented if the equipment had been subjected to the required inspection. Although these accidents may not result in the loss of life, they can result in injuries as well as serious fines for safety violations and costly downtime.

Regularly inspecting overhead crane equipment is one of the most important steps companies can take to cut down on these unfortunate crane-related incidents. However, it is crucial that operators and supervisors do more than give their equipment a quick glance to see if everything simply looks all right. Overhead crane equipment must be put through a rigorous and thorough inspection process before it can be cleared for safe crane operation. What’s more, there are dozens of inspection points that must be checked during these inspections. Additionally, certain inspection points must be checked on a more frequent basis than others, so it is essential that operators and supervisors understand OSHA’s requirements for these inspections. The following crane guide illustrates many of the most important inspection points on overhead crane equipment. By following it, companies can help ensure that their equipment and their job sites will be much safer and better prepared.

We hope you enjoy. If you did enjoy please feel free to share!

Overhead Crane & Inspection Guidelines courtesy of Crane 1

6 Things to Do to Curb Crane Accidents at Construction Worksites

6 Things to Do to Curb Crane Accidents at Construction Worksites

Construction sites have stringent safety protocols in place to prevent adverse events and accidents. Even with all the precautions and preventive procedures, fatal injury rate for the industry is quite high. This can be attributed to a number of reasons ranging from oversight on part of site managers to malfunctioning equipment. Another probable cause is the sheer size of the industry where at any given day more than 6.5 million people are at work at work sites numbering an approximate 252,000.

Cranes cause significant and serious injuries if they are not inspected and checked before use for defects. Fatal injuries can occur if an untrained person operates a crane or if the crane is not used properly. There are several recommendations put forth by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that try to mitigate worker safety issues while using a crane.

Tower and mobile cranes are most commonly used in construction sites. Here are a few things that you need to know in order to avoid accidents in your work site.

  • How Do Injuries Occur?

Grievous injuries occur both on and off-site when a crane collapses or when a worker is struck by othe verhead load. Accidents and fatal injuries also occur when a worker comes in way of a crane’s swing radius, cranes come in contact with a power line or conductor, or when cranes collide with each other.

All of these present possibilities of multiple injuries and fatalities.

Ill-planned and ill-executed crane operations cause delay and obstructions at the construction site, and also cause accidents.

Ensure you follow safety rules and adhere to user instructions. Being scrupulous about adhering to safety rules is the best thing you can do to avoid worksite accidents.

  • Plan Well

Crane operations need to be planned in advance to avoid mishaps. A trained and experienced person has to evaluate the site conditions and address the risks present. Crane operator and other crew members must be aware of potential hazards in the worksite and other unusual operating conditions. The required resources, procedures to be followed and responsibilities of personnel need to be worked out.

Lifting equipment including slings and other accessories should of adequate strength to carry out the operations. They should be tested and inspected for quality. They have to remain safe for the entire range of jobs and period of operations.

  • Follow Safe Work Protocols

It is important to check crane controls and signalling arrangements before commencing work. Wire ropes, chains, hooks and all rigging systems should be checked for strength and efficacy. The load being lifted should not exceed the rated capacity for the make and model of your crane and lifting equipment.

Failure of brake systems is another reason behind work site accidents involving cranes. Raise the load a bit and check the effectiveness of the brake system before launching operations.

Properly trained and competent personnel should operate the crane. They must have prior experience handling similar job role and responsibilities.

Cranes should not be operated without the approval of a higher authority. Also, there should be a competent authority supervising crane operations who can signal the user if anything goes wrong.

  • Evaluate the Ground Conditions

Many incidents occur at work sites when cranes tip over due to poor or unstable ground conditions.

In addition to ground anomalies, a range of other factors also result in cranes tipping over. The outriggers of mobile cranes need to be fully extended or as specified by the manufacturer. When this is not done cranes tip over.

Insufficient counter weights and wind also cause accidents. Another cause behind cranes tipping over is wrongly calculated loads that exceed crane capacity.

Ensure that cranes operate under optimal conditions to avoid worker injuries and fatalities.

  • Maintain a Safety Zone

If possible, it is recommended to maintain a barricaded safety zone to prevent entry of unauthorized people into the lift area. People, structures and other equipment that come in the crane’s swing radius cause accidents and worker injuries. Such incidents occur when the path of the load is not clearly planned and when cranes operate in crowded or high traffic areas.

This is applicable while using overhead cranes in industrial environments as well.

  • Carry out Inspections Regularly

OSHA publishes safety and regulatory rules that need to be followed when operating cranes at construction sites.

Inspections have to be carried out on shift, monthly and annual basis for crane equipment and wire ropes. Post-assembly inspections are mandatory to ensure that cranes are in optimal working condition. Pre-erection inspection is necessary for tower cranes. Four-year inspections for key components like vessel or floatation device is also recommended by OSHA.

Safety and reliability of crane operations depend as much on the user as on the crane hirer. When a crane is hired, planning, supervising and operating responsibilities fall on the user, unless explicitly expressed otherwise.

Conclusion

Safety and security of crane operations depend on a number of factors. It is important to ensure that crane equipment and accessories are maintained well. If you follow the cranes standard set by OSHA, you will be able to reduce accidents at work site drastically.

 

10 Tips for Better Mobile Crane Operations

10 Tips for Better Mobile Crane Operations

 

1. Never override the mobile crane’s computer.

2. Be aware of all overhead hazards – specifically close-by buildings and any power lines that are within the zone of operation.

3. Read the load charts – prior to turning the key in any new mobile crane.

4. Cell phones in the cab – while the crane’s key is on the cell phone is off.

5. Always note the changing conditions on the job site – from personnel to weather to surroundings. If you work at night, ensure the proper lighting is in place to ensure 100% safety.

6. Sometimes in a working situation, the crane operator needs to stop, evaluate, and find a safer lift plan.

7. Check ground conditions – before crane setup, ensure that the site is suitable to support your mobile crane and the future suspended loads.

8. Use appropriate pads & cribbing – mobile crane operators need to make sure they are using correct pads or cribbing to avoid having an outrigger fail or sink when they are making a lift.

9. Before starting your crane, always double check the oil, gas, and other fluid levels.

10. At the beginning of your shift, walk-around your crane checking for mechanical, electrical, structural, and hydraulic issues (MESH).

Mobile crane operators are a small brotherhood whose main goal is to ensure the safety of those we are working with. If we can avoid a few simple operating errors, it will go a long way in avoiding an incident on the job site.

 

Be crane safe everyone, we want you home at night.describe the image

Zoomlion Tower Cranes Erect Pavilion at Expo 2017

With the recent Expo 2017 coming to Astana, Zoomlion placed and used multiple tower cranes to erect the pavilions main buildings.

The building has a diameter of 80m and a height of 100m, with pavilions of other countries evenly distributed around it in a ring shape.

Twelve large-tonnage Zoomlion tower cranes, seven Zoomlion truck cranes and one Zoomlion bulldozer have participated in the pavilion construction.  “Among which four Zoomlion D1100-63, the super-large tower cranes with the maximum hoisting capacity in Central Asia,” said the manufacturer.

The D1100-63 is a new model of self-climbing tower crane, featuring superstructure slewing, double lifting points, level jib and horizontal trolleying. With a hoisting capacity of 9.8t at the 80m jib end, the tower crane adopts variable frequency stepless speed-regulating motor to significantly optimize the system’s running stability and improve positioning accuracy.  PLC (programmable logical controller) is used to control all actions.

The event will take place between June 10 and September 10, 2017.

This was the second time that Zoomlion has been involved in Expo construction, having helped to build the Chinese Pavilion in Expo 2015 Milano.

Zoomlion said: “The direct economic and trade cooperation and cultural exchanges between China and Kazakhstan are of far-reaching significance to promote the development of the “Belt and Road” [Chinese government-backed investment and trade strategy]. As a leading enterprise in the engineering machinery industry, Zoomlion has explored the market in Kazakhstan for over ten years, dedicated to efficiently helping the construction of local infrastructures.”

About the author: Crane Tips is an organization connected to the crane industry to provide crane, crane operation and crane safety tips.

Cranes are Construction Machines Not Toys

The recent ‘climb’ in the number of people trying to scale tower cranes in metropolis’s around North America is getting ridiculous. As reported by the Barrie CTV news, the numbers are ever increasing.

The number of people climbing multi-storey cranes in York Region is a growing concern for emergency crews.

On Sunday night, two 16-year-olds were spotted at the top of a 13-storey construction crane in Newmarket. The teens climbed down and were arrested for mischief and trespassing.
“It seems almost crazy that we have to be here to warn people about the dangers of climbing cranes, construction cranes, but nevertheless here we are,” Const. Andy Pattenden told CP24.

“People, primarily youths, have been climbing these multi-storey construction cranes,” Pattenden said. “It’s happening at night. They’re going out there, the reason for which we’re still not sure why they’re doing it – probably for thrill-seeking, something from YouTube. They’re gonna climb up and take a selfie at the top of these cranes.”

Between May 22 and June 11, police have dealt with four cases of people climbing cranes. These have happened in Richmond Hill, Whitchurch-Stouffville and Newmarket.

Parents are being asked to speak with their children about the dangers.

We couldn’t agree more.

Link-Belt Tests and Introduces TCC-2500 Tele-Boom Crawler Crane – Crane Tips

Link-Belt Tests and Introduces TCC-2500 Tele-Boom Crawler Crane

The new Link-Belt TCC-2500 was already hard at work the same week Link-Belt Cranes formally introduced the 250-ton telescopic-boom crawler crane at ConExpo-Con/Agg in Las Vegas, Nev.

L.R. Wilson and Sons, Inc. of Gambrills, Md., is field testing the TCC-2500, completing tilt-up panel work and steel erection for a 38,000-sq.-ft. warehouse in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Capitol Heights, Md.

A 13,000-lb. spreader bar and six-part load line were used to place panels weighing as much as 84,000 lbs.

“The crane is very smooth. It picked up the largest panels at a 35.4-ft. radius, with a 68° boom angle, and we were good up to 123,000 lbs.,” said operator Jamie Foster of L.R. Wilson and Sons, Inc.

In total, the company set 38 precast tilt-up panels over seven days before moving on to steel erection for the building’s interior.

Wilson normally uses a lattice-boom crane to erect panels of this size, but the company welcomed the chance to prove the new Link-Belt TCC-2500’s machine’s capability.

“This machine is a beast, and I cannot think of a better way to test our design and the functionality of this crane than with pour-in-place tilt wall work. Based on early comments I think we have hit a home run,” said Scott Knight, Link-Belt product manager for lattice and telescopic crawler cranes.

Massive cranes arriving at Deltaport in British Columbia Canada

Massive cranes arriving at Deltaport

Port Community Liaison Committee provides an update on work at Roberts Bank terminal

We found this shared article on Crane Cafe and we thought we would share it here too! The article helps point to the value and significance of the work and employment opportunities that are present in British Columbia Canada.

Port Community Liaison Committee members took a tour of GCT Deltaport recently to see the improvements being made at the Roberts Bank container terminal. 

The following is a report from the Port Community Liaison Committee, a multi-stakeholder body that includes representatives from the community, environment, agriculture, industry and local governments that addresses port-related issues. Heads up! Two new megamax ship-to-shore cranes will soon be arriving at the GCT Deltaport container terminal at Roberts Bank. They are part of a $300-million terminal densification project that will increase container handling capacity at Deltaport without expanding the terminal footprint.

The cranes are being delivered by ship, ready assembled, and – at 92 metres tall – will be the largest and most modern cranes on the west coast of North America. With a reach of more than 70 metres, they can service the largest container ships that are increasingly being used on trans-Pacific routes.

The cranes are expected to arrive early this summer. Community notifications will be mailed out and regular updates will be posted on GCT’s webpage: globalterminalscanada.com/projectupdates/The new cranes are electric powered, with regenerative drives to minimize power use, high-efficiency LED lighting to reduce glare from light, and are equipped with features intended to reduce operational noise levels compared to similar cranes. This should be welcome news for local residents who may be impacted by terminal noise, especially during summer nights when windows are open.

More helpful news is that the long-awaited shore power connections project at Deltaport’s third berth is beginning construction. Once completed, it will facilitate the newer container ships that have the capability to plug-in while at the terminal – meaning they can turn off their diesel engines, saving fuel, reducing emissions and eliminating generator noise. Work to install the duct banks and electrical systems will be happening from June until October, so they may be fully operational for next spring.

The Port Community Liaison Committee (PCLC) feels these steps represent progress in addressing some longstanding community issues relating to noise, light pollution and emissions. It is a demonstration the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority and its tenants are listening and making investments to mitigate impacts on communities in which they operate.

The PCLC will continue working within its mandate to ensure input is provided to decision-makers on a range of port-related issues in the community, including participation in Vancouver Fraser Port Authority-led consultation processes for expansion projects at Roberts Bank.

If you have questions about these initiatives or would like to learn more about the role of our multi-stakeholder committee, please contact the port of Vancouver at pclc@portvancouver.com. We also have a webpage with information, meeting notes and port-related resources. You can find it at www.portvancouver.com.

NFT delivers 10 Potain tower cranes to Royal Atlantis Residences site in Dubai

Tower cranes, they are just cool. They do amazing work and provide quick easy erection of buildings like no other construction equipment on the market. The first units of Potain MR 418 cranes in the UAE have been erected at the Royal Atlantis Residences construction site in Dubai.

NFT, the exclusive dealer of Potain in the region supplied 10 brand new units of the crane for the Palm Jumeirah project, located next to the Atlantis resort.

The MR 418s have been fully erected by NFT on fixing angles at heights ranging from 104m to 190m free-standing.

During Phase 2 of the operation, the cranes will be braced with special anchorage bracing, spanning 16m in length, to the core of the building.

NFT has also delivered two Potain GTMR 400 units to the construction site.

Value-added services provided by NFT as part of the contract include spare parts delivery and technical consulting.

“An entire container filled with MR 418 spare parts” has also been delivered to the site.

In a press statement, NFT said the move ensures client needs are “anticipated and immediately satisfied on site, without worrying about availability and delivery time”.

A two-shift schedule will be implemented to ensure 24-hour operations of the cranes, with full-time technicians to be based on site to ensure non-stop service delivery.

Ssangyong Engineering & Construction and Besix, in a joint venture, were awarded the project’s construction contract in February 2016.

According to the press statement, NFT’s previous work experience with Besix helped it secure the contract to deliver Potain units for the mega project “after months of negotiations”.

Remarking on the project, Bassem Kini, the NFT operations director tasked with the Royal Atlantis Residences project, said: “erection went smoothly, and the tower cranes are working beautifully”.

He added: “The project is positively challenging, and we have enjoyed working with the client’s site team, which is professional and cooperative with NFT.”

Royal Atlantis Resort and Residences will boast almost 800 guest rooms, more than 230 serviced apartments, and 46 storeys.

Tower Cranes in Denver CO

We found this great article posted by NEW9 in Denver Colorado. Pretty awesome to see the life of a tower crane operator from the perspective of an outsider.

Check out the full article below and go check out their full video.

DENVER – It’s the dance of the cranes.

You see them everywhere in Denver – tower cranes building new buildings and fueling Colorado’s economy.

But have you ever wondered who operates those cranes, and how they get up there?

Photojournalist Eric Kehe and I got the chance to find out.

RMS Cranes, a member of the TNT Crane family, and Saunders Construction invited us to go up a crane. They said just climb up the ladder one floor – then do it 30 more times.

Is this a good time to mention I’m not crazy about heights?

We climbed up the crane across from Union Station where they’re building a new office tower.

There’s a little landing on each floor where you can stop to catch your breath, and enjoy the view.

It’s a bit exhausting but we made it to the top, where we met crane operator Jeff Macklin.

Macklin says his days are just ups and downs.

Workers on the ground call him on a radio when they need him to pick up equipment or materials and deliver it to another location.

The cranes of Denver.    

Sometimes he gets calls from different crews in different locations, all at one time.

It’s how he spends his 8 to 14 hour days in the air.

And once he gets up there, he doesn’t climb down until his shift is finished.

If there’s bad weather, he just rides it out.

Rain, hail, snow, wind, lightening – Macklin has seen it all from his perch high in the sky.

He says you need to be highly trained, certified and a little crazy to operate a tower crane.

But on the upside, he says you just can’t beat the view.

“Colorado’s national or state bird is the crane,” Macklin said. “I remember there was a time you’d never see a tower crane up. Now you get 20 or 30 of them. “

Sunrise, sunset, aircraft flying by, even police officers chasing suspects down below – he has the perfect spot to see it all.